www.sarawakborneotour.com For any inquiry, please contact us at :
ask@sarawakborneotour.com
 

Where adventure begins....
 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2017

Let's Go Bird Watching in Sarawak

If you are planning to go to Sarawak any time soon, why don’t you make time to go bird watching while you are there? Sarawak has a lot of destinations where you can do just that!

Sarawak, the legendary land of headhunters and hornbills, is the largest state in Malaysia. This state occupies the north-western portion of the great island of Borneo. Here, the ever wet rainforests reach unparalleled diversity and are home to various kind of tropical wildlife and animals.

A great portion of Borneo’s 650 bird species have been recorded in the state, including most of the island’s endemics such as the bizarre Bornean Bristlehead. Sarawak offers superb birdwatching opportunities as it holds the highest number of national parks and nature reserves in the country. These range from balmy lowlands and shorelines to cold mossy forests at the summits of the higher mountains.

 

Photo credit to Sarawak Tourism Board

 

Kuching and Surrounding Areas

 

Black Oriole (Photo credit to Sarawak Tourism Board)

 

Kuching is a logical place to begin your birding adventure in Sarawak with an international airport and good roads are being well-provided. There are numerous nature reserves within an hour drive of the city that offers you a variety of bird watching opportunities. One of the most popular park is Kubah National Park, which has beautiful lowland rainforests and has a great variety of birds. A number of endemic species for example Bornean Banded Kingfisher, Bornean Wren Babbler, and Blue-banded Pitta could be found here.

 

Bornean Wren Babbler (Photo credit to Sarawak Tourism Board)

 

Bornean Wren Banded Kingfisher (Photo credit to Sarawak Tourism Board)

 

Pygmy White-eye (Photo credit to Sarawak Tourism Board)

 

Next is Santubong National Park. It is located near the coast, with its rugged sandstone terrain and tall rainforests. This is the closest site to Kuching which offers you a chance of seeing Rhinoceros Hornbill, one of Sarawak’s most emblematic birds. It is also a protected species.

Semenggoh Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre, although better known for its population of reintroduced orangutans, is also an excellent bird watching destination that hosts many lowland birds, including the rare Long-billed Partridge. Further south, near the Indonesian border, Borneo Highlands comprises a range of forested hills culminating in Mount Penrissen at over 1300 m in elevation. This area gives you the chance to see some of Borneo’s endemic submontane birds, including Pygmy White-eye, Chestnut-crested Yuhina, Bornean Barbet, and Mountain Serpent-Eagle.

 

Northern Sarawak

 

Asian Paradise Flycatcher (Photo credit to Sarawak Tourism Board)

 

Other than Kuching, you could also fancy bird watching in Miri. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Gunung Mulu National Park is Sarawak’s most famous park. Mulu is incredibly biodiverse and hosts a wealth of rare flora and fauna, although being well known for its amazing limestone cave systems.

The entrance to Deer Cave is an almost guaranteed site for the Bat Hawk, especially at dusk when up to 1.8 million Wrinkle-lipped Bats emerge from the cave. Mulu has an eye-catching bird list of 262 species, which includes all eight species of Bornean hornbills, and over half of the island’s endemics such as Fruithunter, Hose’s Broadbill, and Whitehead’s Spiderhunter. Montane specialties can only be seen via a multi-day trek to the upper slopes of Mount Mulu.

Pulong Tau National Park is Sarawak’s largest reserve, comprising nearly 600 sq. km of pristine montane rainforest. This national park occupies the western flank of the Kelabit highlands. Its spectacular mountain landscapes include Mount Murud, Sarawak’s highest peak (2,424 m), and Tama Abu range.

The main villages, Bario, Ba’ Kelalan, Long Banga and Long Lellang, can be reached by flights from Miri, or alternatively, by four-wheel-drive vehicle. More than 300 species of birds are listed in this park, including the rare endemic Bulwer’s Pheasant and Black Partridge. Pulong Tau National Park has a broad altitudinal range and habitat diversity, and is home to numerous other endemic species including Bornean Whistler, Mountain Barbet, Whitehead’s Broadbill, and the enigmatic Dulit Frogmouth.

 

Dulit Frogmouth (Photo credit to Sarawak Tourism Board)

 

In the far north of Sarawak in Ulu Trusan region, the mountainous Payeh Maga IBA is one of the state’s most promising new birding destinations. You can get there by four-wheel-drive vehicle from the town of Lawas, and while day hike into the forest is possible, you should be prepared to camp in mountain shelters if you wish to spend more time at the higher elevations. Special attractions here that you could also check out include Bornean Frogmouth, Bornean Leafbird, Bare-headed Laughingthrush, and the recently rediscovered Black Oriole.

 

Bornean Bristlehead (Photo credit to Sarawak Tourism Board)

 

Coastal Areas

At the coastal areas, you could spot waders and other water birds as Sarawak offers excellent wintering grounds for those species along its extensive coastline. The globally Vulnerable Chinese Egret often congregates in significant numbers in the Bako-Buntal Bay with possibly the largest concentration of the species in Borneo.

 

Eurasian and Fareastern Curlews (Photo credit to Sarawak Tourism Board)

 

Buntal, a fishing village less than an hour’s drive from Kuching, gives access to part of this coastal region. Spectacular congregations of large waterbirds such as the Far-eastern and Eurasian Curlews are not unusual in the Bako-Buntal Bay in the wintering months, which is usually the rainy season in Sarawak. Some 55 species of water birds, including the Pacific Golden Plover (often seen in its beautiful breeding plumage) have been recorded here. You could also enjoy seafood meals while you are there in Buntal!

 

Rhinoceros Hornbill (Photo credit to Sarawak Tourism Board)

 

How about that? Are you excited to go for an adventure in Sarawak now? Check out our website for different types of great tour packages that we offer you and book your tour with us now or you can email us for a customised tour at here.

Tags: Sarawak | Bird watching | Bird | Birds | Borneo | Sightseeing | Nature | Wildlife | Malaysia | Fun | Leisure | Adventure |

TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 2013

North Borneo Railway Train Schedule

Train Schedule

The North Borneo Railway runs two weekly return departures (Wednesday, Saturday) from Kota Kinabalu to Papar, year round. Lasting approximately 4 hours, passengers experience the lush landscape of the coastal and rural regions of Sabah. A typical ‘tiffin’ colonial lunch will be served on the return trip.

Itinerary :
9.30 am                    Boarding at Tanjung Aru Station – Breakfast is provided
10.00 am                  Depart from Tanjung Aru Station for Papar
10.40 am                  Stop at Kinarut Town – visit Tien Shi Temple or traditional shops
11.00 am                  Depart from Kinarut Station
11.45 am                  Arrive in Papar Town – visit local wet market and shops
12.20 pm                  Re-board train for return journey
12.30 pm                  Depart from Papar Station for Tanjung Aru
12.40 pm                  ’Tiffin’ Lunch onboard
1.40 pm                    Arrive at Tanjung Aru Station

 

Breakfast & Tiffin Set Lunch :

Tags: Kota Kinabalu | North Borneo Railway | Train Schedule | Papar | Tanjung Aru | Kinarut Town | Tiffin Lunch | Borneo Sabah | |

WEDNESDAY, JULY 31, 2013

The wonderful food in Kota Kinabalu

Kota Kinabalu is famous not only for its mountains, seasports and islands but also for their fresh seafood given that South China Sea is just surrounding the Sabah state. I recently took a promotion flight with MASwings airline to Kota Kinabalu for a 3 days break. To start off the trip, my flight was smooth and pleasant with efficient service by the crew. I have always been a seafood lover and really looked forward to really dig in. For anyone who loves seafood, you must not miss their heavenly seafood when you are in Kota Kinabalu.

 

If you do not mind a rather packed restaurants at most times, and the place may be messy and crowded, with  no menu, then check out Welcome Restaurant. The seafood there is cheaper compared to other restaurants. The food is tasty too. Order dishes like sauté crabs, famous local Tuaran noodles, stir fried  vegetables with shell fish, shellfish cooked in Serai” soup, and many others, we are sure you will like it after eating there. The price is slightly cheaper compared to other touristy restaurants.

 

Another restaurant corner worth mentioning is SEDCO Village. It is actually a square corner with several restaurants operating from there. There are simply a very wide variety of seafood to choose from, from lobster to prawns and mantis to crabs that is at least Rm80 per kg and fishes of all types etc. If you have a camera with you, I am sure you will take many photos of the place with the wide variety of seafood.

 

Ikan-ikan located  in the same vicinity as SEDCO village and Welcome restaurant, is also a seafood restaurant. The price is slightly higher than Welcome restaurant but the place is comfortable, air-conditioned, clean and the waitresses there change your dirty plates quite often. The choice of seafood on display is not as much as in SEDCO but I think most restaurants sell  about the same variety of food. What I remembered about this restaurant is their pickled papaya which was a good appetizer before my main course and I enjoyed eating them.

 

If you are looking for somewhere cheap and do not mind the hawker stall food, then you should check out the food stalls near Filipino market. There is an abundant choices to choose from. It will simply leave you wanting some if you see the BBQ food there.

 

The much talked about Roasted coconut is something that is worth trying if you are in Kota Kinabalu. It is slightly further away from Kota Kinabalu city located at Kampung Salut but if you have the time, it is worth to try the roasted coconut, coconut pudding served in plastic cup and some roasted shellfish ( locally known as Lokan). The coconut water would be steaming hot after being roasted. It actually tasted like sweet soup. The flesh is fragrant and soft but crunchy. If you take the larger coconut, it may be more than enough for you to finish if you are a hungry.

 

This roasted coconut has been much talked about everywhere outside Sabah as you don’t usually get to eat roasted coconuts anywhere. So if you are there, it is worth it to try them and not missed it.

 

I definitely had a pleasant flight with MASwings airline and will definitely fly with them again to beautiful Sabah to taste their local seafood.

Tags: MASwings | Borneo Food | Kota Kinabalu | Tuaran noodles | saute crabs | serai soup | SEDCO Village | Filipino Market | Roasted Coconut | Lokan | Kampung Salut | |

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 2013

MASwings offer Discounts up to 85 percent for travel on July-Aug 2013

 

 

Book by: 25 June 2013

Travel between 9 July 2013- 18 August 2013

 

CLICK ->>>> www.MASwings.com.my

Tags: MAswings | Travel Offer | Ramadhan | Syawal | Kota Kinabalu | Miri | Kuching | Borneo special fare | Sibu | Bintulu | Tawau | Sandakan | all in fare | |

FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 2013

The Land of Wind - Bario, Sarawak

The town of Bario, located on the northern part of Sarawak, is not only the home of Kelabit and Penan tribes (both belonging to the Orang Ulu ethnic group) but also the source of  exotic food and crafts. Lying at an altitude of about 3,500 feet above sea level in the north-eastern corner of Sarawak is the famous Bario Highland. Bario is blessed with cool weather with temperatures that could go down as low as 11° Celsius. It has 14 villages with a population of 2,000 people.

Bario Sarawak

Image courtesy of http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bario

 

The name Bario is a combination of the words ‘Ba’ and ‘Rio’. ‘Ba’ means paddy field, while ‘Rio’ means wind. The majority of residents in Bario is of Kelabit descendant, one of the minority Orang Ulu tribes of Sarawak, formerly known as headhunters and warriors in the past but now successful planters and farmers. Although the highlands are named after the Kelabits, it is actually home to many other groups such as the Penan and Lun Bawang. The Lun Bawang, who are the same group as the Lun Dayeh in Sabah, are the predominant people around Ba Kelalan in the northern part of the highlands. All of them are collectively known as the "Orang Ulu" or "People of the Highlands".

 

A gateway to Kelabit highlands is made possible by flying to Bario with MASWings from Miri.

 

Most of the area's accommodation is found in and around Bario, and it is the main starting point for treks throughout the area. You can go kayaking or immerse in the historical tales of the monoliths that dot the area. The place has incredible organic food such as the famous Bario rice and pineapple.

 

One of their annual events is the internationally known Bario Food Festival also known as 'Pesta Nukenen', held in July each year since year 2005. Nukenen means food in Kelabit. It was relatively small when it first began but now it has become larger, made popular with the fact that visitors could get the chance to savour the famous Bario rice and pineapple during the festival while taking in the wonderful highland setting.

The Land of Wind Bario Sarawak

 

The festival had grown larger in scale and included jungle-trekking packages, historical site visits and longhouse homestay experience. It attracted visitors not just from Malaysia but also as far Japan, England, Australia and Denmark. All visitors were pleasantly surprised to find that the local food that they savoured were not only cooked traditionally albeit using wooden stove, but also served on leaves and bamboos, making the entire experience refreshingly eco-friendly. Fish, venison and other hunted animals were also cooked in the mixture of various ingredients indigenous to Bario.During Nukenen Fest, various products – from crops to wild products to Orang Ulu crafts – were exhibited and sold at the E-Bario Telecentre.

 

It can get quite chilly in the evening so do bring a sweater. Daytimes are usually warm and humid, especially when struggling through thick forests while trekking. The rainy season is between October and February.

Pay a visit to Bario, Sarawak by flying with MASWings to visit the 'Pesta Nukenen'and experience the life of Sarawak inland.

Tags: Bario | Borneo Sarawak | Kelabit | Penan | Bario Highland. Orang Ulu | Best Kuching Hotels | MASwings | Lun Dayeh | Pesta Nukenen | E-Bario Telecentre |

FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 2013

Manukan Island- an Unforgettable Honeymoon getaway

Do you want to experience an unforgettable honeymoon trip? Then you should go to Manukan Island for a perfect honeymoon getaway. It is only within a short boat rides away from Kota Kinabalu. Once you are there, you will know why the beautiful Manukan Island is extremely popular amongst tourists and local Kota Kinabalu residents alike.

MASWings has regular flight from Kuching to Kota Kinabalu once every day. From Brunei, three daily MASWings flights connect Bandar Seri Begawan to Kota Kinabalu. If you are coming from across the sea, there are available direct flights from Kuala Lumpur to Kota Kinabalu.

From Kota Kinabalu, you can take the ten-minute boat ride from the Jesselton Ferry Terminal to this beautiful island. Manukan Island is one of the largest islands in Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park, Sabah’s only marine national park. The magnificent Manukan Island has a lot to offer to visitors coming to its shores. The clear blue water surrounding Manukan Island makes it the perfect spot to go snorkelling or diving. In fact, these two activities are popular amongst visitors to this island.

If you go for a dive in the water, you will be astounded by the colourful variety of tropical fish and beautiful coral reef formation littered throughout the area. Apart from snorkelling or diving, you can in indulge many other activities in Manukan Island such as para sailing, jet skiing and boat riding. You could just simply sail along the water surrounding this island and enjoy the breath taking scenery with clear blue skies that complemented the equally clear blue water. The soft clean water is indeed captivating to the eyes. Do make sure you take many photos when you are here to capture this perfect scene!

On Manukan Island itself, you can find many things to do to indulge yourself in the honeymoon vacation that you are in. The various choices of accommodations available here will surely make you want to spend a night or two with your loved one in this tropical paradise. Manukan Island boasts complete recreational facilities for visitors, with several restaurants serving local and international cuisines, several chalets, a clubhouse and of course a dedicated diving centre for avid divers out there.

Walking together hand in hand with your loved one down the beach, with its clean sands and the beautiful palm trees rustling overhead is one experience that you will never forget. Visitors to Manukan Island often say that this island is one of the best places for a honeymoon getaway. You would be hard-pressed to disagree with them once you are here to see Manukan Island for yourself. The various indigenous plants and animal life throughout Manukan Island adds to the colourful atmosphere of this natural retreat. Watching the sun setting across the horizon is indeed a romantic and breathtaking view.

Words alone cannot describe the beauty of Manukan Island. You really have to go there to fully experience it. If you are planning for a honeymoon getaway, why don’t you take a trip to Kota Kinabalu, hop on a boat and head straight to this wonderful island for a trip of a lifetime?

 

Tags: Manukan Island | Sapi Island | Sabah Borneo | Honeymoon Sabah | MASwings | Manukan Island Resort | Jesselton Ferry Terminal | Taman Tunku Abdul Rahman |

SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2013

Mari Mari Cultural Village and Monsopiad Cultural Village, Sabah

Sabah is popular with its diverse ethnics and rich history. The Mari Mari Cultural Village and the Monsopiad Cultural Village are two of Sabah’s popular tourist spots in learning and finding out more about the culture and history of these ethnic groups in Sabah.

 

Together with MASWings, let us unfold the two cultural villages and see what do these two have in store for us.

Mari Mari Cultural Village is situated in a remote forest in Kionsom, Inanam. It is an ideal setting for a cultural village which preserves the environment of the tribes long ago. Situated 25 minutes away from the city and in a remote forest, you could enjoy only the sound of nature and the closeness of what the tribes feel years ago. Entering the village requires you to cross a hanging bridge to cross the river and get to the other side.

 

Upon entering the village, you will be introduced to a variety of ethnic tribes in Sabah such as the Bajau, Lundayeh, Murut, Rungus and Dusun. You will also be shown their traditional homes and how each and every house has a different look and feel. Besides that, the different ethnics at the cultural village will even demonstrate their traditional way of cooking food in bamboo and the brewing of Montoku, known as rice wine which is the favorite drink of the Dusun tribe.

 

Other tribes present there will also demonstrate the different kind of skill sets such as the traditional way of lighting a fire by the Rungus tribe, the extracting of tree bark in order to make various items such as ropes, vest, floors, and walls by the Lundanyeh tribe, and also blowpipe making by the Murut tribe. There are many more demonstrations in the cultural village itself such as dances and musical performance. Besides that, they will even teach you how to cook or craft using their traditional way if you are interested in learning.

 

The Monsopiad Cultural Village on the other hand, is another cultural village worth going to. The Monsopiad Cultural Village is founded in 1996 making it Sabah’s first living museum. The cultural village is situated beside the Penampang River and is surrounded by many other traditional buildings. It takes about an hour and a half from Kota Kinabalu and if you are wondering where the name Monsopiad comes from, the name is taken from a fearsome warrior who lived in the village of Kuai long time ago.

The Monsopiad Cultural Village is a Kadazan cultural village allowing you to learn more about the Kadazan tribe. Upon arriving at the village, you will be treated to various Kadazan displays such as their ceramic jars, padi grinders and bamboo items. You will also be shown the costume of Bobohizan Inai Bianti, a direct descendent of Monsopiad. There are lots of other interesting things being shown at the cultural village alone such as a massive monolith holding a dozen legends, and also the House of Skulls, where you will be shown 42 skulls which are also trophies of war from Monsopiad.

 

There are a lot more to the cultural village and it will not be interesting if you don’t see it for yourself. Let MASWings Airline fly you to Kota Kinabalu, Sabah and learn more about the various ethnics in Sabah.

Tags: Mari Mari Cultural Village | Borneo Sabah | Best Sabah Hotels | Monsopiad Cultural Village | MAswings | Kionsom | Inanam | Bajau | Lundayeh | Murut | Rungus | Dusun | Montoku | Kadazan | Bobohizan Inai Bianti |

FRIDAY, MAY 24, 2013

Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre in Sepilok, Sandakan Sabah

Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre in the Malaysian Sabah District of North Borneo was founded in 1964, to rehabilitate orphan of orangutans. The site is 43 sq km of protected land at the edge of Kabili Sepilok Forest Reserve. Today around 60 to 80 orangutans are living freely in the reserve.

 

The facility provides medical care for orphaned and confiscated orangutans as well as dozens of other wildlife species. There are also some other animals that may be found in Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre, namely sun bears, gibbons, Sumatran rhinos and the occasional injured elephants.

Sepilok Orang Utan Sabah

 

Recently rehabilitated individuals have their diet supplemented by daily feedings of milk and bananas. The additional food supplied by the centre is purposefully designed to be monotonous and boring so as to encourage the apes to start to forage for themselves.

 

In the wild orangutan babies stay with their mothers for up to six years while they are taught the skills they need to survive in the forest, the most important of which is climbing. At Sepilok a buddy system is used to replace a mother’s teaching. A younger ape will be paired up with an older one to help them to develop the skills they need.

Sepilok Orang Utan Sabah

 

The creation of reserve areas minimises the impact of deforestation on orangutans and far fewer young apes become the victim of the illegal pet trade as a result of these ‘sanctuaries’. Babies are often caught during logging or forest clearance or captured by poachers who slaughter the adult apes to reach them. The Malaysian Government has clamped down on illegal trading, outlawing all such practice and imposing prison sentences on anyone caught keeping them as pets.

 

While orangutan rehabilitation is still the primary goal at Sepilok, it also focuses on public education on conservation, research and assistance on other endangered species such as the rhinoceros. Sepilok is considered by the Wildlife Department to be a useful educational tool with which to educate both the locals and visitors alike, but they are adamant that the education must not interfere with the rehabilitation process. Visitors can apply to work there as a volunteer helping with the cleaning and caring of the orangutans.

 

Visitors are restricted to walkways. Some orangutans have become familiar with people but touching them is strongly discouraged, and while the apes are naturally shy and gentle, the more mischievous ones may try to grab your camera or hat, in which case you should call for a ranger as trying to wrestle the 200 pound apes may not be a good idea. For the more adventurous, there is trekking through mangrove forests. As this is under the Forestry Department, you will have to get a permit from them before trekking the 5km trail which runs through Sepilok Laut. You can also arrange for a return boattransfer or accommodation in chalets in the forests.

 

You must go to Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre if you would like to know more about the orangutan and MASWings makes it easy for you by providing you direct flights to Sandakan, Sabah. Visit www.maswings.com.my now to book your flight!

Tags: Sepilok Orangutan | Borneo Sabah | Sandakan | Best Sabah Hotels | Borneo Island | MASwings | sun bears | gibbons | Sumatran rhinos |

THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2013

Main Reasons Why Sabah And Sarawak Must Be your Ultimate Destinations

  Sabah and Sarawak are two different locations in Borneo Island. The word Borneo has been there since year 1839 when James Brooke made his first landing in Kuching city itself with his ship by the name of The Loyalist. Ever since then, the White Rajah has been governing Sabah and Sarawak for several generations, which eventually gave Sabah and Sarawak a new chapter.

 

  As time flies by, Sabah and Sarawak now becomes the ultimate destination for domestic and international tourist spot. Both Sabah and Sarawak have so much to offer when it comes to travel. Be it for family vacation, business trips or personal visits.

 

If you are still unsure what Sabah and Sarawak have to offer you, then here are the main reasons why Sabah and Sarawak must be your ultimate destination.

 

 

Food

  Food alone is more than enough to represent the cultures in both Sabah and Sarawak. In Sarawak, places like Kuching City, is a heaven for food lovers on their personnal blogs. Some even described the taste of food in Kuching itself, is like a fantasy and filled with all sorts of colours and presentations.

 

  In Sabah, food such as the Sago worm is an exquisite dish that you can find in the jungle. It is usually served deep fried or you can eat after it is boiled.

Culture

  Both local and international tourists have so much to learn when it comes to culture. For an example, a visit to the longhouse deep within the heart of Sarawak is something to look forward to. Although it is generally known as longhouses, the ethnic groups in Sarawak especially the Ibans are divided into a few different ethnics as can be seen from their ethnic Ngajat dance have different version in the longhouse.

 

  If it is in Sabah, the most unique cultural dance you will find is the Bobohizan dance. Performed by a group of Papar Kadazan, the Sazau Bobohizan dance will be performed by the priestess. The dance is used to send spirits of the dead to a different realm known as Pongouvan.

 

 

Challenges

  The UNESCO heritage site, Mount Kinabalu or the Pinnacles in Mulu National Park will fulfill that desire.

 

  As for Mount Kinabalu, for those who had the experienced of climbing Mulu Pinnacles, Mount Kinabalu is much easier for them, but if you are a first timer, Mount Kinabalu is hard enough to be tackled for a first timer.

 

  Both offered different challenges respectively. Then again, most tourists who took up the challenge on climbing up Mulu Pinnacles mentioned that it was not easy getting up there. It is not just only about the weather, but also the mind and physical toughness is something that you need to prepare before you can attempt the climb Mulu Pinnacles.

 

 

Beautiful Rainforest

 

  The archipelago of rainforests both in Sabah and Sarawak, have been preserved and labelled as protected rainforests in the world. Visiting either one, will let you see how these rainforests in each state tend to grow on top of one another creating a beautiful canopy like you have never seen before.

 

  If you are tourists who happen to be doing some research and looking for new medical discoveries, then you might want to try out Sabah and Sarawak as the million years’ old rainforests will give you rare insights.

 

 

 

Historical values

 

  Every city has a story to tell. And every state changes from time to time leaving historical footprints behind. The Kundasang War Memorial in Sabah is a place where relatives and families of fallen heroes will gather and reflect back on their sacrifices. Those fallen heroes, consist of British and Australian soldiers who marched a total of 160 mile and leaving only 6 survivals to tell their tales.

 

  In Kuching, one of most prominent historical site it is the Kuching City Waterfront itself. Before it was converted into a Waterfront, it was also known as a place for early settlements of the sea Dayaks.

 

  Then in year 1864, after the landing of James Brooke, Chinese businesses started to grow like mushrooms. And the historical business district can still be seen across the road of the entire whole stretch of Kuching Water Front.

 


 

Festive Seasons

 

  Due to the mix culture in Malaysia, especially in Sabah and Sarawak, you will have the Christians, Chinese, Dayaks, Indians and Malays. The different believes and ethnicities, is what makes Malaysia unique. For an example, the Chinese will celebrate the Chinese New Year, Moon Cake Festival, Wesak Day and Chap Goh Mei. As for the Dayaks, it would be the Gawai festivities. Muslims on the other hand will celebrate Hari Raya which is also known as Eeid Season by international Muslims. Christians as usual, will be Christmas and Indians would be the Deepavali.

 

  With all the mixed ethnicities, during the festive seasons, you will see different kinds of cookies and food laid out on the table.

 

 

Food is cheap

 

  Food in Sabah and Sarawak is still considered cheap. All you need to bring is RM 10 in your pocket to have a decent meal and a glass of water from those outdoor street cafes for the day.

 

 

World Rainforest Music Festival

 

  Usually held every year, in the middle of June, the sound of traditional music comes from all over the world and can be heard during this time of the year. During the event itself you will get to hear music from other parts of the world and watch live performances.

 

 

  The above reasons would be good enough for you to decide to pack your bags and head over to Sarawak and Sabah in Borneo.

Tags: Sabah and Sarawak | Borneo Island | Sabah and Sarawak Food | Mount Kinabalu UNESCO Heritage | Mulu National Park | Mulu Pinnacles | Borneo Rainforest | Sabah Sarawak Rainforest | Sabah War Memorial | Kundasang War Memorial | World Rainforest Music Festival | |

MONDAY, APRIL 22, 2013

Most Memorable Trip in Borneo- Day One & Day Two (Part 3): The Nanga Ukom Long House

  The moment we arrived at Nanga Ukom longhouse Sarawak Jared, the assistant to the tuai rumah, warmly greeted us. Jared functions as a secretary to the longhouse chief, tuai rumah by recording the names of any visitor that visits Nanga Ukom longhouse
 
 
  We took a deep breath, settled down for a while and had a little chat with the longhouse residents. As I walked around, I noticed several peculiar objects that were hung all over the long house area. These objects were present in every corner of the longhouse. I asked Jared about these curious objects. He then proceeded to tell me an interesting tale about the object.
 
 
  The Iban people of Sarawak called these objects Piring Ampun. The Piring Ampun serves as a memorial for those who have recently departed. The Piring Ampun is hung on every corner of the long house as a sign for the departed spirits to ask them to go to the next world in peace as their time in this world has ended. The Piring Ampun is hung for a duration of 100 days starting from the date of the deceased’s time of death as the Iban believe that it’ll take the recently departed 100 days to reach his final destination. Food is put on the Piring Ampun as a sign of offering for the departed spirits. I was fascinated by this tale since although I’m an Iban boy I grew up in the city and have never heard of Piring Ampun.
 
The longhouse chief, tuai rumah returned to the longhouse at around 5.30pm. He greeted us warmly and sat down with us. The relatively young tuai rumah, at the age of 28, gave us a tour of the longhouse. He invited the Spanish couple to watch the cock-fighting event or locally known as Sabung Ayam, which they politely refused! As for me, I took the opportunity to watch this traditional longhouse past time. I can see some residents bringing up their best roosters for the event. In this event, the participants from either the same longhouse or another longhouse would pit their roosters against each other to win the bets that are placed on the winning rooster. However, I didn’t manage to catch the exciting part of the cock-fighting event, as both of the roosters in this cockfight were reluctant to fight each other, which was then considered as a draw.
 
 
 
  Our dinner at 7.30pm consisted of mouth-watering traditional Iban cuisine such as chicken cooked with ginger, green vegetables and jungle ferns. I also managed to observe an interesting thing that evening. The tuai rumah’s father was treating his grandson who was down with fever. He smeared a twenty-cent coin with a white sap powder, put in on his grandson’s stomach and recited some prayers. This was the first time that I have even seen a traditional Iban medicine at work.
 
  Later, we all gathered at the hallway and were treated to an enchanting Ngajat dance performance accompanied by the sound of a beating gong. The tuai rumah’s father started the dance and two young ladies then joined him in. The beauty of the Ngajat dance is something that you must experience within the traditional longhouse setting.
 
 
 
 
 
 
  After the dance, the longhouse chief, tuai rumah served us Tuak, a traditional wine made from either rice or sugarcane, to us. The taste is uniquely different from the typical beer or liquor. We are then entertained with some stories.
 
  We were told of the significance of an Iban tattoo that decorated most of the resident’s bodies. Tattoo is like a marker for a person’s rite of passage. When a young man is newly married, a tattoo will be carved on his body before he leaves the community. It is a sign that the boy has reached maturity. Even until today, when a person is about to leave his longhouse, before he travelled, a tattoo will be carved on his body as a reminder on his roots. In the distant headhunting past, a tattoo on an Iban warrior’s knuckle signifies the number of enemies that he has slain.
 
  We also learnt about that evening was on how the next longhouse chief, tuai rumah is selected. The new tuai rumah is a male selected from the previous tuai rumah’s own bloodline based on his capabilities and maturity. If the tuai rumah has no sons, he will have to marry of his daughter and pass down the title to his future grandson. The tuai rumah may only decline appointment by resigning once he took office. The office of the tuai rumah is for the duration of five years.
 
  We then had a history lesson about Nanga Ukom longhouse Sarawak. It was founded 29 years ago by the tuai rumah’s grandfather who moved from the jungles of Batang Ai to be close to the river. Several families subsequently joined him and settled here up to this day. The Nanga Ukom residents worked as farmers and fishermen. They would travel downriver to Lubok Antu to sell their produce at the market.
 
  The tuai rumah then explained to us about customary Iban marriage in Sarawak. In the past girls were married off at the age of 15 or 16. Nowadays, they would be given the choice of getting married at 18 after finishing school to go on to look for employment. The couple wishing to get married must first seek out the tuai rumah and request for a marriage. The tuai rumah would normally consent. If a couple wishes to divorce, they will bring the matter up to the tuai rumah. They would have to explain to the tuai rumah about the reason for the divorce.
 
  After the long story session, our first day ended. We kept ourselves warm by wearing long sleeved clothing as we slept in the cold longhouse.
 
 On the second day of our trip, we woke up at 7 am, had breakfast and readied ourselves for our journey back. We then walked back up the same trail that led us to Nanga Ukom to see how the locals make blowpipes.
 
 
 
  Dani and Ann, the Spanish couple, bought some beautifully made handicrafts. The intricately made and beautifully carved blowpipes and wooden shields on display here really fascinated me. The price was even cheaper here compared to downtown Kuching.
 
 
 The blowpipe that we saw was made out of high-grade quality ironwood. It can last for more than a hundred year. The blowpipe was around 10 inches long, about the same length as a British Musket.  If you want to use the blowpipe, you would have to insert one or two bamboo darts inside it. You will then blow through it to hit the target in front of you.
 
 
 These bamboo darts were lethal as they were usually coated with poison that can cause the victim to fall unconscious. In the past, the headhunters use the blowpipes before decapitating their target.
 
 
 When James Brooke landed in Borneo, he encouraged the locals to use guns. The blowpipe was supposed to be passed down from one generation to another. It is not meant be given away or sold. 
 
  Our tour guide and the Spanish tourists went in for a walk into the jungle for the next 45 minutes. They wanted to see various types of plantations and crops. As my sports shoes were in a bad condition, I had to wait for them from inside the boat. I took more pictures of the dangerous trail that the residents of Nanga Ukom have to go through daily.
 
 
 
  We learnt that what makes the Nanga Ukom culture so beautiful was than the unity that the Nanga Ukom residents have as one family under one roof. They treated us with great warmth and welcomed us like family member. It felt really good and refreshing despite of the short time we spent there.
 
  You definitely must spend some time with the people of Nanga Ukom longhouse and get to know them better. They were eager for us to learn of their culture as well. It was an extremely amazing and fulfilling experience. Although we were tired and exhausted from the long journey, we all agreed that it was worth it. The visit to the Semenggoh Wildlife Centre, the pepper farm and the sharing of our time with the Nanga Ukom longhouse residents will leave us a long-lasting memory of the wonders and beauty of this land I call home.
 
 
Tags: Sarawak Longhouse | Borneo Longhouse | Long House in Sarawak | Iban in Sarawak | Sarawak Nanga Ukom Long House | |

SATURDAY, APRIL 13, 2013

Most Memorable Trip in Borneo- Day One (Part 2): Trip to the Pepper Farm and Nanga Ukom

  Our next stop was the pepper farm, which is about one hour's trip from the Semenggoh Wild Life Centre. During our short trip to this wonderful farm, we had   the privilege of discovering the secret behind Sarawak’s well known black pepper farm. I have heard of both locals and tourists giving wonderful feedback on the world famous Sarawak Black Pepper.
 
 
 
  We also saw some grinding machines that are used to produce the wonderful Sarawak Pepper that we have grown to love, especially here in Sarawak. These grinding machines were designed with two sections, namely the right and left section. The right section of the grinding machine is used to produce low quality pepper. The left section on the other hand is reserved for making premium quality pepper.
 
 
  The old machine, which was put up for display purpose, also functions the same way as the new machine apart from the fact that  it was made out of wood and needed to be operated manually.  The old-fashioned grinding machine that we saw in the pepper farm works by the operator to turning the hand-operated round lever. The new machine on the other hand only requires the operator to pour in the pepper seed and let it do the grinding on its own. 
 
 
 
  After we had our fill of observing the fascinating method on how pepper is produced in this farm, we embarked on our three hours journey to Nanga Ukom longhouse. On our way to Nanga Ukom, we made a quick stop at a small town called Lachau to buy some gifts and a few necessities that would be useful for the longhouse community we were planning to visit. I bought some small packets of food for the children of the longhouse. The Spanish couples settled for some bags of salt since our tour guide mentioned that these things are much needed the residents who would otherwise have to travel some distance to town in other to get them.
 
 
  We began to notice that the clouds were getting darker so we proceeded with much haste. We hope that that it will not rain until we reached our destination. We finally arrived at Nanga Ukom at around 4.30pm. From here, we will continue on to the longhouse by boat. Our tour guide was fortunately sensible enough to arrange transportation with the boatmen in advance. We will spend 45 minutes on the boat before finally reaching Nanga Ukom longhouse. The boatmen had to make several stops along the river, turned off the boat engine and navigated by oar through some narrow parts.
 
 
  We were lucky that our journey down the river to Nanga Ukom longhouse was pleasant. In fact, the dark cloudy skies eventually receded and gave way to sunny weather. We were initially very afraid that it would rain and we might end up having to delay our trip. The unspoilt view along the river was very breath taking indeed. After 45 minutes on the boat, we finally reached the vicinity of Nanga Ukom longhouse. From here, it’ll just be a 10 minutes walk towards the hills of Nanga Ukom before we reached the longhouse. We just simply can’t wait to meet the residents of Nanga Ukom longhouse and get to know more about the traditional Iban living. I’m sure that’ll be something to write about!
 
Tags: Sarawak Pepper Farm | Sarawak Kuching Pepper Farm | Borneo Kuching Pepper Farm |

Most Memorable Trip in Borneo- Day One: Trip to Semenggoh Wild Life Centre, Kuching

  I was looking forward for the trip on the first day with Joey, my friendly tour guide and two tourists from Madrid, Spain called Danni and Ann.
 
 
 
  As I looked up the skies, I could see that the weather was good even though it was little bit cloudy. We started off our journey at 8 am from Singgah Sana Lodge in downtown Kuching. While waiting for Joey, we made preparations and checked to see whether we have everything in our backpack.
 
  When we were inside the van, Joe gave us a briefing regarding the rehabilitation centre since it was important for us to know about the rules and regulations when looking at the Orang-utans. He gave us this list of   DO’s and DON’T’s once we arrived.
 
The DON’T’s
 
1)      Do not bring food or drink during the trip as they are sensitive to smell
        2)      Do not use a stick or your fingers to point at the Orang-utans as they will consider it as a   challenge
        3)      Do not use flash while taking pictures as they will be shocked and would possibly attack you.
        4)      Do not attempt to touch the Orang-utan younglings as their mother is very protective.
        5)      Do not stare directly into their eyes as it will provoke them.
        6)      Do not stand too near the Orang-utans for safety reasons.
        7)      Do not bring a camera tripod. They will think that it is a weapon.
 
The DO’s
 
        1)      Do be careful when walking. Orang-utans might perch on the treetops doing their business.
        2)      Always look up as some young naughty Orang-utans tend to throw stones or tree branches
        3)      Do RUN if the shelter ranger told you to do so!
 
  It took us at least an hour’s journey from Singgah Sana Lodge to the rehabilitation centre took us. The journey time can be extended to a further 15-30 minutes if the traffic is busy. We arrived at our designated destination by 9 am. We walked down the trail and followed our guide. We had our first sight of the Orang-utans at our first pit stop.
 
  We were fortunate to see a mother Orang-utan and her child coming out from bushes. Although it was their feeding time, they do not seem to be eating at all. As we walked along the trail, we could see a signboard with all the Orang-utans’ name written on it. It somehow reminded me of the old Western style ‘Wanted Dead or Alive’ poster. 
 
 
 
  When I interviewed one of the rangers named Mr. Mustadza, he told us that the Orang-utans’ names were given after the staff who worked in the rehab centre. Some were named after famous people. One of the Orang-utans here is called Ritchie. The 35 year old Ritchie weighs around 150 to 160 kg. He got his name from James Ritchie, who was a famous photographer as well as a journalist. Somehow, Ritchie did not make his debut appearance on that day. However, we were happy enough to see a female orang-utan called Seduku and her child along the way. Seduku was initially nervous when she encounters a large number of tourists. She tends to carry her child behind her back as if she is trying to prevent humans to take her child away.
 
 
 
  Some of the rangers advised us to keep our distance at least 5-6 feet away from them. Her child was just 5 months old. One hour later, Seduku’s husband, called Anwar, came out. Anwar is lazier and is less protective over his child since he prefers the attention from the photographers. However, we still needed to be cautious and alert just in case anything goes wrong.
 
  According to the rangers, there have been cases where rangers were attacked by the Orang-utans last year. One of the trails where this incident happened was closed for safety reasons. They might look cute and fragile but they can be very aggressive. A ranger told us that the orang-utans are just like humans with their own mood swings. We even learnt some amazing facts about Orang-utans. Do you know that their DNA resembles human DNA by at least 90 to 95 percent? I guess that explains their mood swings. One of the wildlife centre rangers was attacked last year by a female Orang-utan called Hot Mama. This fiery Orang-utan is legendary for her short temper and aggressivenes.
 
 
 
 
  Mustadza explained that the Semenggoh Wildlife Centre was meant to be a rehabilitation centre for Orang-utans and other wildlife. The Semenggoh Wildlife was finally open to the public after receiving enthusiastic public interest and enquiries. Mustadza goes on to explain that the general public wanted to see the wildlife roaming around in a natural setting rather than being caged. I can’t help but agree with him on that point. Seeing these marvellous Orang-utans and other wildlife moving freely in this beautiful wildlife centre is indeed a breath taking and awe-inspiring moment!
 
 
 
  After spending an hour in the Semenggoh Wildlife Centre we followed our guide and headed off to the pepper farm where the famous Sarawak black pepper is produced. As we looked forward to this next part of our trip, we were glad that we had the chance to see the Semenggoh Wildlife Centre and its colourful inhabitants.
Tags: Kuching Semenggoh Wildlife Center | Borneo Kuching Semenggoh Wildlife Center | Orang Utan Semenggoh Wildlife Center | Sarawak Semenggoh Wildlife Center |

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013

Let us Tee Off With MASwings Special Promo Fare

  Have you picked your travel dates yet or are you still planning your destination? Are you looking for that affordable flight tickets? Well folks here it is! It is time to Tee Off with MASwings promo fare!
Let’s Tee Off With MASwings promo fare price are from Kuching to Balikpapan at RM 99, Kuching to Pontianak at RM 160, and Kuching to Bandar Seri Begawan at RM 145!
.
You may start your booking now as seats are limited and travel any time before the end of July 2013!
 
 
 
 
 
 
MASwings - Let us Tee Off
 
 
 
 
 
Tags: Kuching | Best Kuching Hotels | Borneo Sarawak | Balikpapan | Pontianak | Brunei Darussalam | MASwings | Sibu | Miri | Bintulu |

THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2013

Kuching Cat Icon Monument Wears a New Hat

 

 

 Kuching City’s famous Cat Icon Statue recently received a new urban art makeover from a group of Kuching volunteering knitters. The new look of the Cat Statue, now has a new purple with cream and a white hat, as well as a golden yellow purplish scarf that makes it looks like a Boy Scouts team.

 

 This Kuching City Cat Statue iconic monument wears different costumes for different occasions. Before this, it was the Chinese New Year festival season. The Cat Statue was well decorated with Chinese costume in conjunction with the holiday festival season.

 

 The art makeover volunteered by the group of Kuching knitters, was led by Crafthub director, Heidi Munan. They stitched a nine metre strip of yarn into a hat and another three metre into a scarf. To ensure the hat is well placed on the Cat Statue, it was reinforced with metal wires making sure it will last long under the humid weather in Sarawak.

 

 Materials used were from recycle and unwanted items such as thrown away water bottles and pompoms.

 

 Miss Heidi Munan, the director and leader of the club for Crafthub, mentioned the idea to start out and decorated the Kuching Landmark Cat Statue was proposed by a group of non-government organisations since last year.

 

 It took the group 6 months to complete the costume. During that period of time, they met up once a week to do the stitches and some of them who were looking forward to it eventually decided to continue the job at home with the given materials.

 

 The only cost involved was labour as the beautifully produced yarn was made from recycled items or a half completed work and unwanted yarns.

 

 Heidi was inspired by the design from the latest urban street art called yarn bombing. Originally yarn bombing was used to decorate trees and benches made of colourful knitted and crotched yarn or fibre clothes.

 

 “It is hoped that this attempt on urban street art would not only promote the art but also entice city folks to take up this new interests and expand its use in the future as an embellishment to the cityscape and the promotion of the city’s culture and tourism” she said.

 

 Their hands are currently tight with charitable works at the Children Cancer’s ward of the Sarawak General Hospital, by knitting colourful patched blankets and hats. After that, they will move on to stitching soft toys.

 

 Those who are interested to learn stitching may drop by at the Sarawak Museum Café on Wednesday from 10 am to learn stitching from Heidi.

 

 Kuching South City Council (MBKS) Mayor Dato James Chan advised public not to touch or remove the hat or scarf.

 

 “You are welcomed to come and take photos but don’t disturb it. Do not take it away,” said Chan.

 

 As a show of support, the group also presented a hand-knitted blue, white and red coloured hat to Chan.

Tags: Kuching City | Kuching Cat Statue | Kuching Cat Statue Sarawak | Kuching Cat Statue Borneo |

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2013

Balikpapan-the hidden treasure of East Kalimantan

 

There's good news for everyone who is itching to go to fly off to a new exciting destination, Balikpapan in East Kallimantan! MasWings is now offering three weekly direct flights from Kuching and Kota Kinabalu to Balikpapan’s Sepinggan International Airport, the second busiest airport in Borneo, starting from 1st February 2013. So hurry up and don’t miss this opportunity to fly and try out MasWings newest destination.

 

Balikpapan in Indonesia is in the country’s province of East Kalimantan. Balikpapan in Indonesia is well known for its booming oil industry. Several multinational oil companies use Balikpapan in Indonesia as their base of operation within the region. Apart from being known as the oil town of East Kalimantan, there are many interesting places and fun things you can you can do in Balikpapan, the second largest city in East Kalimantan.

 

The wonderful city of Balikpapan has a population of over 600, 000 people. With just the right size of population, Balikpapan is neither too big nor too small and thus you’ll never feel as if it’s either too crowded or too small. As a seaport city, Balikpapan Indonesia is very close to the sea. You’d really have to come here yourself to see the beautiful beaches that Balikpapan has to offer.

The warm and friendly inhabitants of Balikpapan, comprising of a mixture of natives and people from all over Indonesia coming here working in the oil industry is one compelling reason for you for you to discover the beauty and charm of Balikpapan.

 

 

 

Once you’ve here in Balikpapan you must be wondering what place you should be visiting in this East Kalimantan city? Well, Balikpapan boasts several interesting places that will surely captivate you during your visit here. For starters, you can visit several of the most well known markets in Balikpapan. To experience a slice of traditional life in Balikpapan you can pay a visit to Klandasan Market within the city. This government-organised traditional market is in Jalan Sudirman. You can browse through the various fresh produce such as fruits, crabs, fish and lobster on display here.

 

Are you interested in bringing back a souvenir as a memento of your visit here in Balikpapan? You can find lots of beautiful local handicrafts and jewelleries at the Garden Inpres Market, which is famous amongst the tourists visiting here. The gemstones on sale here are amongst the cheapest in Indonesia since Balikpapan is very close to where these gemstones are mined. What better way can you find to impress the folks back home than to bring some glittering gemstones back? The well-made handicraft from the local Dayak tribe also on sale here are also no less impressive. You’ll spend hours browsing through the arrays of impressive wares on offer at the Garden Inpres Market.

 

As Balikpapan is a seaport, it obvious that it has a beach where you can stroll along and watch the beautiful sunset and the waves crashing on the shore. Kemala Beach is in Jalan Sudirman right in the city. So, you don’t have to wander far away to get to the beach. How more convenient can you get from this?

As Balikpapan has a number of expats executives either working in the oil industries or flying in out of the city frequently, the range of hotel accommodations here are impressive. The oil industry in Balikpapan really does this city a lot of good when it comes to accommodation. Be rest assured you’ll definitely find your stay here a very comfortable one.

 

MasWings operates its flights weekly from Kuching and Kota Kinabalu to Balikpapan on Tuesdays, Fridays and Sundays. With these three new flights per-week commencing on 1st February, why don’t you try out Balikpapan and discover this unique hidden treasure of East Kalimantan soon? Who knows, you might even want to come back here for a repeat visit!

 

Tags: Maswings | Balikpapan | Klandasan Market | Garden Inpres Market | Kemala Beach | Jalan Sudirman | Kuching Sarawak | East Kalimantan | Kalimantan | Indonesia | Visit Balikpapan | Balikpapan Indonesia | Borneo |

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2012

Borneo Long House Story

Longhouse Story Longhouses in Sarawak and Sabah are actually very different than the longhouses designed in Europe. Europe longhouses architectural materials consist of tough bricks and just a few blocks in one unit. In Sabah and Sarawak, longhouses are made from simple wooden trees, with stilts on it, divided into different section, rooftops made out of leaves and families living inside can be a total of 100 families all in all with a living room which they call it as the Ruai section. Then...

Read More "Borneo Long House Story"

Tags: Sabah Sarawak Longhouse | Borneo Longhouse | Longhouse in Sarawak and Sabah | Annah Rais Long House | Long House in Sarawak | Iban in Sarawak | Borneo Tours |

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2012

What is Funniest video contest all about?

 

Funniest video contest is a fun contest for you to WIN 20 ROLLS of DELICIOUS SWEET Kek Lapis Sarawak couriered all the way to your home. 

So do quickly submit a short video of you or your family members or friends or even your pet in action. Tickle us with laughter and get the most votes to win those yummy famous Sarawak Kek Lapis Sarawak. Contest runs from 14 Nov - 20 Nov 2012. So Hurry!

Just grab your smarphone or hp and take a short ORIGINAL VIDEO in less than 3 mins of either you/ your family/friends/ pets  in action.

Upload to YouTube.

Then copy the url and paste it here.

Share on your wall, Promote to your friends to vote for you. You get 1 extra points for every referral friend of yours who submit an entry.

The video with the highest VOTES win!

So go ahead and share the Cake with your friends!

Click here to join now!!!

Tags: Kek Lapis Sarawak | Funniest Home Video Contest | Cuti-Cuti Sarawak | Best Kuching Hotels | Sarawak Borneo |

SUNDAY, AUGUST 12, 2012

Seven Reasons Why Kuching City Is Worth the Visit.

 

Kuching is the capital city of Sarawak , the largest state in Malaysia . Kuching, the largest city in East Malaysia, is home to around 600,000 of Sarawak ’s multi-ethnic population. Kuching is uniquely the only city in Malaysia to be divided into two administrative parts, Kuching South and Kuching North Back in the 19th century this city was known as Sarawak before it was renamed as Kuching.

This laid-back and colourful city will capture the hearts of those who visited here. In fact, some would even be reluctant to leave after spending some time in Kuching. There are so many reasons why it is worth your while to visit Kuching. Here are seven of them.

Meet the diverse and friendly people of Kuching

When you arrive in Kuching you will be amazed by the diversity of it population. In fact, Kuching is one of the most multicultural cities in Malaysia . In the streets of Kuching you will see the Chinese, Iban, Bidayuh, Melanau, Orang Ulu and Malay people rub shoulders together as they go about their daily lives. The Chinese population is centred in Kuching South while the Malays live in Kuching North. The rest of the population is spread evenly throughout both part of the city. Indeed, you will be charmed by their warmth and friendliness to visitors to Kuching. Take the time to learn about the different cultures living together in Kuching and be amazed by the rich cultural heritage of this multicultural city.

 

 See the historical places in Kuching

When you walk around Kuching city, you will notice several buildings from the old colonial days with their unique 19th- early 20th century architectures. For example, the majestic-looking Kuching Post Office, with its impressive ornamental Corinthian columns and semi-circular arches was built in 1931. Who would imagine that a post office would look so majestic! Across the river in Kuching North, you will see the Astana, formerly known as the Government House, which was built by the 2nd Rajah of Sarawak in 1874. The regal look of the Astana definitely befits its status as the governor’s residence. Indeed there are many more historical buildings you can discover here apart from these two examples.

 

 Explore the Kuching Waterfront

 If you are in Kuching, you must not miss taking a walk along the scenic Kuching Waterfront with its beautiful view of the Sarawak River . You can see the Astana looming on the other side of the river. You could even take a short boat ride to Kuching North which is just across the river from here. This one kilometer pedestrian riverside walk also has many stalls selling tourist souvenirs and food. So you could enjoy a leisurely walk and browse through the wares and food on offer here.

 

 Go souvenir hunting in the Main Bazaar

 Looking for nice souvenirs from Kuching? Well, the nearby the Main Bazaar is the place for you to go. However, do remember to bargain for the right price to get a good deal! You can see a whole row of shops selling traditional handicrafts, antiques and many other interesting items here. The shops themselves, with their old colonial architecture, are also interesting to look at. You’ll spend hours here browsing through all the stuff.

 Stroll through India Street Mall

 Not far from the Main Bazaar, lies India Street Mall. This pedestrian walkway has been home to Indian traders in Kuching for countless of years. Here you can find shops selling fabrics, textiles, clothing, books and other every day items. Indeed, the unique sight and sounds of this street mall adds more colour to Kuching city.

 Visit the first cat museum in the world

Kuching is home to the first cat museum in the world, which is appropriate since the name Kuching means ‘cat’ in Malay. Located on a hill with a good view of Kuching, the Cat Museum is only 10 minutes drive away from the city centre. Here, you can see various items relating to cats, ranging from cat-themed statues, pendants, stamps to personal photo collections. This one of a kind museum in Malaysia will definitely delight all cat lovers.

 Experience the delicious Kuching food

Feeling hungry after doing all these explorations? Well, it’s time to try out the mouth-watering Kuching food. There are a variety of local cuisines such as the famous Kolok Mee, Laksa Sarawak, traditional Iban bamboo chicken, friend Midin vegetable and many more. By all means, try them out. If you plan to watch your weight while you are in Kuching, let’s just say you should do that after you finish your trip!

 The more you spend your time exploring Kuching; you will undoubtedly discover more reasons why this place is really worth the visit. And who knows, you might not even want to leave at all after experiencing the sights and sounds of this beautiful city.

Tags: kuching city | where to go in kuching | must visit places in kuching | kuching town | kuching city | kuching | sarawak | kuching borneo | kuching malaysia |

THURSDAY, JUNE 28, 2012

Going through the Headhunters? Trail to hunt for adventure

The Headhunters’ Trail is definitely the most complete way to explore Gunung Mulu National Park. Considered as one of the best trekking path in the whole of Borneo, the Trail is a must of those who wish to see the whole of Mulu National Park comprehensively, and also Northern Sarawak.

 

Mulu Pinnacles at Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak Borneo

Mulu Pinnacles at Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak Borneo

Once, when headhunting was practiced more than a hundred years ago, Kayan warriors from Baram foraged through the Mulu area to attack the Murut longhouses and Chinese settlers who lived along the Limbang River.
 
Those fearsome war parties paddled their boats up the Melinau River up to the Melinau Gorge, before dragging the boats overland for 3 km towards the Terikan River. The so-called ‘Kayan Road’ where the boats were dragged was a 4-metre wide trail, having poles laid across the path, is now called ‘Headhunters’ Trail’.
‘Headhunters’ Trail’
 
A trek along the Trail would be of high preference for those who wish to ultimately challenge their muscles, as well as those participating in a teambuilding trip.
 
Mulu National Park can be reached by air from Miri or Kota Kinabalu, and upon arrival at the Mulu Airport, visitors would be transferred to their Benarat Inn for lunch. After lunch, they would be led for a 45 minutes walk to visit the Deer and Lang Caves via the plankwalk.
 
Both of the Mulu Caves in Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak is a part of the largest cave passage in the world, and perhaps the most well-known Mulu cave, Deer Cave, with its enormous chambers is home to
more than 5 million bats.
Deer Cave entrance at Gunung Mulu National Park
 
Here also visitors can witness one of the most popular attractions in Gunung Mulu National Park, the wonderful display of the bats coming out in waves from the cave as they move towards the jungle to hunt for food at night. Visitors then would return to the Mulu National Park headquarters in early evening, and be transferred by van back to Benarat Inn for dinner and a restful slumber.
 
Day two would start just after breakfast, and visitors would be brought by boat to the source of the Clearwater River for a visit to the Wind and Clearwater Caves, another two of the famous Mulu caves. Lunch would be at the Clearwater Spring, and then visitors would be transferred by boat to Long Lutut. They would then have a 3-hour trek through the lowland jungle to Camp 5, a very basic accommodation for the night. And in rather basic conditions, visitors would enjoy dinner and then sleep.
 
Jungle trekking at Gunung Mulu National Park
 
The breathtaking Mulu Pinnacles of the Gunung Mulu National Park beckons visitors on the morning of the third day. After breakfast, visitors would make the climb to Mount Api, and during the ascent, they could see how the vegetation changes as big trees gradually give way to bushes and plants such as rhododendrons. Reaching the top, visitors could enjoy their packed lunch while admiring the brilliant view across the Pinnacles towards the Brunei Bay. They would then move down to Camp 5 for rest and dinner, and a well-deserved sleep.
 
Some trees could be a thousand years old.
 
Once breakfast for the fourth day is completed, visitors would then move along the Headhunters’ Trail, crossing through two rivers to reach the both at Kuala Terikan. From there, they would go down the river to the Iban longhouse. They would spend a night as guests there, in basic conditions without much comfort, but providing the first-hand experience for the Iban lifestyle and their customs. Visitors could expect to sleep on simple mats on the ground, and having their own sleeping sheets would be very helpful. The Ibans are rather a very friendly group of people, and are generous to share their traditional music and dances.
 
The Ibans are rather a very friendly group of people, and are generous to share their traditional music and dances.
 
Morning of the fifth day arrives, and visitors would bid their Iban hosts and friends goodbye, before making their journey home to Medamit by boat. From Medamit, they would travel by land to Limbang airport before taking the flight to Miri, and those going back to Kota Kinabalu would be transferred by boat to Labuan, before reaching Kota Kinabalu.
 
 
Visitors exploring the Headhunters’ Trail should be prepared by having the usual essentials such as long sleeved shirts and pants, T-shirts, water bottle, towel and toiletries, torch light, raincoat, sun lotion, and of course, a bed sheet and a pair of good trekking shoes.
Tags: Headhunters trail | headhunter trail | gunung mulu | mulu national park | show caves of mulu | deer cave | borneo adventure |

FRIDAY, JUNE 22, 2012

Australian War Memorial Park

A must-visit in Kundasang is the Kundasang War Memorial which was established in 1962, this was one of the first memorial to honour the brave Australian and British Prisoners of War who perished in Sandakan during the notorious death marches to Ranau during World War II. 

 

Kundasang War Memorial Park is one of the first memorial to honour the brave Australian and British Prisoners of War who perished in Sandakan
Kundasang War Memorial Park is one of the first memorial to honour the brave Australian and British Prisoners of War who perished in Sandakan
 
 
The Kundasang War Memorial is dedicated to the memory of the 1,800 Australians and 600 British servicemen who perished in the P.O.W camps in Sandakan and they were forced to march from Sandakan to RanauThe memorial also honours the people of North Borneo who risked their lives to help the POWs. They were forced to march by the Japanese Army somewhat 260+ kilometers through the jungle of Borneo.
 
Dedication plaque at the Kundasang War Memorial Park
 
Major G. S. Carter, D.S.O. (Toby Carter) a New Zealander employed with Shell Oil Co. (Borneo) initiated the building of the Memorial in 1962, together with the launching of Kinabalu Park; to commemorate the fallen Australian and British prisoners at the Sandakan POW Camp. The fort-like Memorial was designed by J.C. Robinson, a local architect. 
 
 
Kundasang Was Memorial is an hour drive away from Kota Kinabalu town and you will arrive at this town called Ranau. The Kundasang War Memorial Park is situated at the foot of Mount Kinabalu and is very close to Kundasang food and vegetable market. The temperature here is slightly lower than other parts of Sabah making it an optimum spot for vegetations. The temperature here is cold, similar to the likes of Ba’kelalan
 
War plaque
Plaque engraved with the names of fallen heroes
 
With its towering pine trees and blooming roses, the Memorial is made up of four beautiful gardens - the Australian Garden, the English Garden, the Borneo Garden and the Contemplation Garden and Pool - to represent the different nationalities, and a walk in the garden is resonant to that of a stroll in a quaint English garden. The scent of roses lingers in the air and the serene atmosphere makes Kundasang War Memorial an ideal place to contemplate and remember the heroes of the war. Visitors can also opt to view a brief video on the history of the Sandakan Death March. 
 
With its towering pine trees and blooming roses, the Memorial is made up of four beautiful gardens
 
This place would probably take you about 30-40 minutes to cover as they are surrounded by a few sections. You just need to pay a small entrance fee which is being used to  maintain Kundasang War Memorial for generations to come. 
Tags: Kundasang War Memorial Park | POW camp | Sabah | Kundasang | Prisoner of War | War Memorial Park Sabah | WW2 Sabah History | Borneo | North Borneo | Kundasang POW camp | Australian War Memorial Park |

FRIDAY, JUNE 8, 2012

Find the best meals at Kubah Ria Baru

 

I would like to bring you guys to see what’s new at the Kubah Ria Baru, which is located not far from Satok area. It is just besides Satok Bridge within the Petra Jaya area. If we take the bridge from Satok we could see the place on our left.
 
As the name suggests, Kubah Ria Baru is considered new in which it was publicly opened in mid-2010. Kubah Ria Baru was built to replace the old Kubah Ria which is quite well known among the local townsfolk. Seeing that it was my first time here what I can say is the place looks beautiful from the outside.
 
The environment is clean and neat, maybe because the place is still new and well maintained by the cleaning staff. Parking lots are available for visitors but with a price of RM1.00 per hour. I you wish to avoid paying for parking fees you can park your car farther a bit and walk in.
 
 
Most of the current stalls are mostly from the previous Kubah Ria stall owner but there are some new ones as well. Pizza Ria is available for those who loves pizza but most of the stalls serve local delicacies such as satay, the infamous mee kolok, chicken rice and laksa Sarawak. There is even a stall that serves 'ayam panggang' or roasted chicken, which reminded me of Kenny Rogers seeing that the chicken was roasted on hot charcoal.
 
For those who would like to have something foreign there are also western and Japanese food available. There are a total of 45 stalls here in Kubah Ria Baru.
 
In terms of price, it is reasonable and quite worth it but you need to pick the right stall. You can choose to order your meal from any stall and sit anywhere you like. The best part of eating here is the view. Located just beside the Sarawak River, the outlook of the whole place is just gorgeous especially during dawn.
 
Be amongst the first to experience the totally new eating environment! If you would like to visit Kuching, Sarawak to see what the city of cats has to offer, you can check us out www.SarawakBorneoTour.com for the best deals or you can email us your inquiries to Ask@SarawakBorneoTour.com. 
Tags: Kubah Ria Baru | Sarawak Borneo Food | Kuching Food court | Best kuching hotels | Kubah Ria Food Court |

TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 2012

Magrina Awing George is crowned as Miss World Harvest Festival (WHF) 2012

Miss World Harvest Festival (WHF) 2012 Magrina Awing George poses with 1st runner-up Gracia Vicky Chua and 2nd runner-up Karissa Kara Simon after being crowned at the Sarawak Cultural Village on Saturday. 

 

Magrina Awing George is crowned as Miss World Harvest Festival (WHF) 2012 at the Sarawak Cultural Village here on 26 May, 2012 and the 19-year-old said to be always be proud of your native heritage, strive to be the best and never look down on yourself.
Of mixed Kayan-Iban parentage, Magrina from Miri gave these words of encouragement particularly to the Orang Ulu people in the hope that her native community would go all out to achieve success and embrace development to be on par with advanced societies in the country.
Making her first foray into a beauty pageant, she beat 13 other finalists for the coveted crown, and walked away with a cash prize of RM3,000, a sponsored Diploma in Tourism Management course courtesy of UCSI University and a complimentary stay at Grand Margherita Hotel among others.
“I am very happy and excited. I have never expected this. With this win, I will continue my studies. The winnings will be used to help my family,” she told the press after the event.
The second of five children, Magrina who aspires to become a successful television personality cited her mother as her biggest influence. Apart from winning the Miss WHF 2012 crown, she also won third place in the Miss Talent subsidiary title through her rendition of Jessie J’s hit song ‘Price Tag’ earlier in the evening, pocketing a cash prize of RM500.
Coming in second in the Miss WHF 2012 pageant was 18-year-old Gracia Vicky Chua who is of mixed Iban-Chinese parentage from Kota Samarahan. The school leaver who aspires to become a teacher won a cash prize of RM2,000 apart from a sash, trophy and flower bouquet for the top three winners.
 
 
Gracia also spotted a lovely voice when rendering the late Datuk Sudirman Arshad’s ‘Salam Terakhir’ at the Miss Talent competition.
Karissa Kara Simon, 23, of Iban parentage, was third and got herself a cash prize of RM1,000. She also won RM700 for winning the Miss Photogenic subsidiary title.
As for other subsidiary titles, Miss Beautiful Eyesight went to 21-year-old Bidayuh Farahana Zita Joes. She also came second in the Miss Talent category after entertaining the crowd with her ‘Dangdut’ dance move to the tune of ‘Goyang Dangdut’. In total, she won RM1,400 for her achievements in both categories.
Twenty-year-old Stephanie Yiap Ai Nee who is of mixed Chinese-Bidayuh-Filipino-Japanese parentage was Miss Congeniality, and walked away with a cash prize of RM800, courtesy of 360 Hotel. The hotel also announced that all finalists would each receive a complimentary stay package.
Yiap, who is currently pursuing a Degree course in Business, also took first place in the Miss Talent title. Her lively performance of ‘Let’s Get Loud’ by Jennifer Lopez won her RM1,000. She also pocketed a further RM500 by winning the Miss SMS Favourite title with a total of 4,410 votes.
Miss Versatile subsidiary title went to 23-year-old Kayan-Canadian Rebekah Livan Balan. She won a cash prize of RM700 and a hamper. Rebekah who loves to play the ‘sape’ rendered Tuku Kame’s ‘Lan E’ instrumental and sang Misha Omar’s ‘Pulangkan’ as she opened the night’s Miss Talent competition.
Best Traditional Costumes title went to 19-year-old Iban from Sri Aman – Annie Salang. She pocketed RM500 while 24-year-old Helina Sarani Saba, an Iban from Bintulu, took home RM300 for winning Miss Best Catwalk.
All subsidiary title winners also received a bouquet of flowers and sash.
Prior to the announcement of the Miss WHF 2012, the audience was entertained by cultural troupes such as ‘Giring-Giring Bamboo’ from Sumatera, Indonesia, Sungai Asap (Belaga) Orang Ulu Cultural Group and the Orang Asli Jo’oh Mah Meri from Kampung Bumbun Selangor.
A theme play – The adventure of Kumang and Keling based on Iban folklore – was performed before the start of the Miss WHF 2012 programme.
Tourism Minister Datuk Amar Abang Johari Tun Openg was the guest-of-honour at the event. Also present were Assistant Tourism Minister Datuk Talib Zulpilip, Tourism Ministry permanent secretary Datu Ik Pahon Joyik who is chairman of WHF 2012 and Sarawak Cultural Village general manager Jane Lian Labang who is also organising chairperson of WHF 2012.
Tags: WHF 2012 | World Harvest Festival 2012 | World Harvest Festival | Sarawak Cultural Village | Dayak | Dayak Culture | Gawai | Borneo | Kuching | SCV |

FRIDAY, MAY 25, 2012

World Harvest Festival

 

The World Harvest Festival 2012 is one of the highlights of the Gawai Dayak celebrations which is an ethnic festival. This will be its eighth year and is organised at the Sarawak Cultural Village from 26th to 27th May 2012, it also helps to bring both locals and foreigners together to experience the true Sarawak culture. World Harvest Festival 2012 is not only synonymous with the festivities of the Dayak, but has come to encompass other ethnic groups in Sarawak as well as the tourists, to help reflect the true Malaysian spirit of the people.

The World Harvest Festival 2012 was introduced in line with Ministry of Tourism Sarawak’s objective to position it as an international event on its tourism calendar. The World Harvest Festival 2012 provides the opportunity for the non–Dayak to understand the cultures, traditions and aspirations of the Dayak community. The awareness and interest created by the festival promises to benefit both the public sector and tourism industry.

Among the many highlights of the World Harvest Festival 2012 cultural event is the theme play held on May 26th, 2012. “Selanting Kuning & the Dragon King”, based on the Bidayuh legend was featured last year and this year it will be on the Iban legend entitled “The Adventures of Keling & Kumang”. What is unique about this theme play is that the whole Village becomes the stage, and the entire play promises to overwhelm the guests in audio and visual splendour.

Another highlight to capture the festival and mood of the guests is the ethnic beauty pageant “Miss World Harvest Festival 2012”. This beauty pageant revolves around the Iban community theme. Fifteen beauties will vie for the coveted title this year, which never fails to add colour and vibrancy to the festival. The proud winner last year was Miss Suljirina Lucas, 27 years old Berawan lass.

As always the Harvest Festival or Gawai is celebrated on a grander scale with the participation of cultural troupes from other countries. This is evident in the International Cultural Extravaganza, with day time workshops. This year our friends from Indonesia and Selangor will be joining the festivities. A series of joint workshop by the locals and the invited troupes will be held during the 2 days festival. This is the ideal time for the visitors to have the opportunity to learn about each community’s traditions, foods and handicrafts.

For those who want to prove their manly prowess, there is the Ironman World Harvest Festival 2012 competition. This is another highlight in the festival that involves 15 finalists who exhibit ‘superhuman’ strength in tackling the traditional based activities like blowpipe shooting, coconut dehusking, 50kg gunny rice lifting, wood chopping and mountain climbing. Last year, Encik Amir Hanafi emerged as the champion.

The WHF promises to be the fun-filled event for the young and old. Bring along your loved ones and make this an affair to remember. What awaits you is a cultural extravaganza like no other. Tickets are on sale for RM60.00 per person (adults) and RM30.00 for children (age 6 - 12 years old) at the Sarawak Cultural Village. Any inquiries that you have regarding the event you can e-mail to Ask@SarawakBorneoTour.com or browse through our interesting packages at www.SarawakBorneoTour.com.

Tags: WHF 2012 | World Harvest Festival 2012 | World Harvest Festival | Sarawak Cultural Village | Dayak | Dayak Culture | Gawai | Borneo | Kuching | SCV |

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23, 2012

Ritchie - The Semenggoh Orang Utan's Idol

Ritchie - The Orang Utan's idol

 

The most famous orang utan in Sarawak, Borneo will be Ritchie. Ritchie is the oldest living male orang utan in Semenggoh Orang Utan Rehabilitation here in Sarawak, Borneo. Born in 1981, Ritchie is now 31 years-old and weighs about 31 kilos.

Orang utans are a species of great ape found only in South East Asia on the islands of Borneo and Sumatra, although evidence of their existence has been found in Java, Vietnam and China. The gentle red ape demonstrates significant intelligence, with ability to reason and think and is one of our closest relatives, sharing 97% of the same DNA as humans.

Ritchie is the dominant alpha male of the pack, and he is like the king of the jungle here at the Semenggoh Orang Utan Rehabilitation. He rarely makes an appearance in front of tourists who come and visit the centre, so it is sometime really hard that we get to see him around.

He's very active among the orang utans in the centre, and said to have very strong arms where he swings from tree to tree.

Ritchie is said to be very smart where he was seen to open a coconut by himself, drinking the coconut juice first before opening up the coconut shell to eat the pulp. His favourite foods are fruits and coconuts.

Every time when Ritchie makes an appearance, the orang utans will keep their distance from him, as Ritchie is known to be aggressive against other orang utans. It was said that he once got into a fight with a fellow male orang utan named George in the centre. George was moved out from Semenggoh and was placed at Matang Wildlife Centre.

So if you guys are interested in seeing orang utans in their natural surroundings, Semenggoh Orang Utan Rehabilitation will be a good choice.

Semenggoh Orang Utan Rehabilitation Centre is undoubtedly one of the best attractions in the Kuching area. It offers the opportunity of getting close to some highly mischievous, semi-wild Orang Utan. Semenggoh became the first forest reserve in Sarawak in 1920. It was turned into a wild life rehabilitation centre for monkeys, Orang Utans, honey bears and hornbills in 1975.

The aim is to reintroduce as many of the animals as possible to their natural habitat, as many had been orphaned by logging or were being illegally kept as pets. There is more to see in the morning as the young monkeys and Orang Utans are put back in their cages at 3pm. The best time to visit Semenggoh is during feeding time, which takes place between 8.30-9am and 3-3.30 pm.

Go to www.SarawakBorneoTour.com for more info or e-mail us at Ask@SarawakBorneoTour.com for any inquiries.

Tags: ritchie orang utan | borneo sarawak | best kuching hotels | Semenggoh Ritchie | Ritchie orang hutan | Kuching Semenggoh. |

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 2012

Come And Celebrate Gawai With Us At Sarawak Cultural Village

Gawai Festival is celebrated all over Sarawak, Borneo but the best choice to personally experience the celebration as a traveller will be the capital city of Kuching. Come to Sarawak Cultural Village - which is the same venue used annually for the Rainforest Music Festival - is a popular and convenient place for tourists to learn more about Sarawak's indigenous cultures.
 
Sarawak Cultural Village has the reputation of being the finest ‘living museum’ in Southeast Asia, which combines history, tradition, the lifestyle and architecture with a dash of education and portion of the theatre to create a unique multi-cultural extravaganza.
 
Now Sarawak Cultural Village is offering Special Gawai Packages for tourists who wish to celebrate Gawai Festival and get up close and personal with the Dayak people. Sarawak Cultural Village is offering tourist the Gawai Special Package. Held from 18th of May until 30th of June, tourist will get up close and intimate with the Dayak people, mainly Iban and Bidayuh and celebrate Gawai Festival while experiencing their culture and traditions. There are also various activities for a tourist to participate in learning the cultures of the Dayak people. For those who are curious on what Gawai is all about and want to experience it for themselves check out www.SarawakBorneoTour.com on what we have to offer.
 
Gawai Dayak Festival in Kuching is great fun; Iban and Bidayuh families’ offer guest with gallons of rice wine and real longhouse-style home cooking. Gawai Special Packge is a chance to get the feel of celebrating the festive Dayak season up-country, in the village and longhouses. This is a chance of spending your holiday in Iban Longhouses and Bidayuh villages, and has a great time in both, while experiencing something different and plus you get to get close with nature.
 
Gawai Festival is a celebration of good harvest. The Dayak communities celebrate this festival to give thanks to the gods for the good monsoon resulting in a plentiful harvest. This festival brings along all the members of these communities who eat, drink and dance together.
 
The festivities start right from the end of May and continue till the middle of July. Clothed in the traditional dress, everyone takes part in the various cultural functions. The elders however perform the traditional rituals. There are ample food and drink on offer for everybody. Tuak, wine (made from rice) and a wide variety of other food items are served.
Don’t forget to click on to www.SarawakBorneoTour.com and you can e-mail your inquiries to Ask@SarawakBorneoTour.com.
Tags: Sarawak Cultural Village | Sarawak | Borneo | Dayak | Gawai | Iban | Gawai Dayak | Bidayuh | Kuching City | living museum | Rainforest Music Festival | Gawai Celebration | Iban people celebration | harvest festival | rice harvest festival | Selamat Hari Gawai |

What Is Gawai Festival All ABout?

Every year the Dayaks of Borneo, Sarawak celebrates the Gawai Festival where the word Gawai means a ritual or festival on June 1 every year. Dayak is a collective name for the native ethnic groups which consists of the Iban and the Bidayuh people. Gawai Festival is celebrated as both religious and social occasion where the Dayaks normally visit (also commonly known as 'ngabang' to the native tongue) friends and family on this day.

The manner of festivity varies from place to place. But usually the necessary preparation starts early. Tuak (rice wine) is brewed (at least one month before the celebration) and rather traditional delicacies like penganan (cakes from rice flour, sugar and coconut milk) are prepared. As the big day approaches, everyone will be busy with general cleaning and preparing food and cakes. On Gawai Festival Eve, glutinous rice is steamed in bamboo (ngelulun pulut). In the longhouse, new mats will be set in place out on the ruai (an open walkway which runs through the entire length of the longhouse). The walls of most bilik (rooms) and the ruai are ornamented with Pua Kumbu (traditional blankets). A visit to clean the graveyard is also conducted and offerings offered to the dead. After the visit it is important to bathe before entering the longhouse to ward off bad luck.

The celebration usually begins on the evening of May 31st. In most Iban longhouses, it starts with a ceremonial rite called Muai Antu Rua (to cast away the spirit of greed), signifying the non-interference of the spirit of bad luck in the festivity. Two children or men each dragging a chapan (winnowing basket) will pass each family's room. Every family will throw some unwanted article into the basket. The unwanted articles will be tossed to the ground from the end of the longhouse for the spirit of bad luck.

Around 6 pm or as the sun sets, offering (known as miring) rite will take place. Before the ceremony, ritual music (gendang rayah) is performed. The Feast Chief thanks the gods for the good harvest, and asks for guidance, blessings and long life as he waves a cockerel over the offerings. He then sacrifices the cockerel and a little blood is used together with the offerings.

Once the offering ceremony is done, dinner is then served at the ruai. Just before midnight, a procession up and down the ruai seven times called Ngalu Petara (welcoming the spirit god) is performed. During this procession, a beauty pageant to choose the festival's queen and king (Kumang & Keling Gawai) is sometimes conducted. Meanwhile, drinks, traditional cakes and delicacies are served.

At midnight, the gong is beaten to call the celebrants to attention. The longhouse Chief (tuai rumah) or Gawai Festival Chief will lead everyone to drink the Ai Pengayu (normally tuak for long life) and at the same time wish each other "gayu-guru, gerai-nyamai" (long life, health and prosperity). The celebration now turns merrier and less formal. Some will dance to the traditional music played; others will sing the pantun (poems). In urban areas, Dayaks will organise gatherings at community centres or restaurants to celebrate the evening.

Other activities that may follow the next few days include: cock-fighting matches, and blowpipe and ngajat competitions. On this day, 1 June, homes of the Dayaks are open to visitors and guests.

Traditionally, when guests arrive at a longhouse, they are given the ai tiki as a welcome. From time to time, guests are served tuak. This would be called nyibur temuai which literally means "watering of guests".

Christian Dayaks normally attend a church mass service to thank God for the good harvest.

Gawai Dayak celebrations may last for several days folks, so check us out on www.SarawakBorneoTour.com to come and celebrate Gawai with us. We have various packages including homestay programmes so your Gawai Festival experience would be an exciting one. Any inquiries you can e-mail us on Ask@SarawakBorneoTour.com.

Tags: Tuak | Gawai Festival | Sarawak | Borneo | Dayak | Gawai | Iban | Gawai Dayak | Bidayuh | Kuching City | Gawai Dayak | longhouse |

Looking Forward To Gawai

The Gawai Festival is celebrated with excitement across Sarawak, Borneo in both cities and rural villages, Gawai Festival is a multi-day cultural festival to honour the native people of the Dayak community which consists mainly of Iban and Bidayuh.
 
They celebrate Gawai Festival on the first and second of June every year. Gawai Dayak is an up-to-date version of Gawai Padi, the rice harvest festival traditionally celebrated by both the Iban and Bidayuh people, to give thanks for a successful harvest.
 
More than just a touristy demonstration of indigenous culture for tourists, Gawai Dayak is celebrated with genuine joy and enthusiasm. Weddings take place, singing and toasts fill the air, and families are reunited with one another after being separated all year.
 
The traditions celebrated during Gawai Dayak are ancient, but the holiday is not. The first Gawai Dayak festival took place in 1965 after several years of renewed cultural pride within the oppressed Dayak community. When first asked to create a public holiday in celebration of the Dayak people in Sarawak, the colonial government refused; they were afraid that other minority groups would make similar demands. Instead, the government declared June 1 as "Sarawak Day". Eventually, once Sarawak was awarded independence, the holiday was officially changed to Gawai Dayak.
 
More than just a demonstration of indigenous culture for tourists, Gawai Dayak is celebrated with genuine joy and enthusiasm. Gawai is an occasion for parties, fun and games, processions and ‘open houses’. At rural dwellings, especially in roadside villages and remote villages, guests are expected to taste tuak and eat at each household. Thus in a 30 door Iban longhouse with a family living behind each door, it means partaking in festivities over and over again. Music and dancing usually follow to liven up the mood.
 
In Kuching, celebrations start a week before with colourful street parades and cultural activities. On the eve of the Gawai, a grand state dinner is held at the Civic Centre with singing, dancing and a beauty pageant which culminates in the crowning of several Gawai Queens, one each for Iban and Bidayuh communities.
 
Obviously, Gawai Dayak is the best and the most interesting time to visit Sarawak as you can see and sample the lifestyle and its festivities. All visitors are warmly received and accepted as new friends even if they happen to be strangers. It is a happy time for all concerned.
 

For those who are curious on what Gawai celebrations is all about and want to experience it for themselves come and check out www.SarawakBorneoTour.com and see what we have to offer. You can e-mail your inquiries to Ask@SarawakBorneoTour.com for more information or book online directly.

Tags: Tuak | Gawai Festival | Sarawak | Borneo | Dayak | Gawai | Iban | Gawai Dayak | Bidayuh | Kuching City | Gawai Dayak | longhouse | celebration |

Meaning Of Gayu Guru Gerai Nyamai

You must hear a lot of the local people say Gayu Guru Gerai Nyamai during the jovial season of Gawai but what does it means? It actually means long life, health and prosperity in the Iban language The Ibans has many festivals called ‘Gawai’ but the most popular celebration would be the ‘Gawai Dayak’ (harvesting festival). During such festival, besides the customary observance of ritual, there is usually a lot of drinking of the locally brewed rice wine called tuak, much merriment and dancing called ngajat and displays of elaborate traditional costumes.

“Gawai” or festivals are often held at the end of the Rice Harvest throughout most parts of Sarawak, Borneo and this is a celebration of unity, aspiration and hope for the Dayak which mark the end of the rice harvest and usher in another year of bountiful goodness. During this festival, almost everyone dresses in traditional costumes while the elders perform traditional rites.

First celebrated on 1st June 1965, it is the feast for the eyes with its colourful rituals, traditional music, cock fighting, feasting and games. It is simply a time for merrymaking.

Tuak (rice wine) and an array of traditional food are generously served. Widespread celebrations are held not only in the main cities and towns but also in the interior settlements. Gawai is an occasion for parties, fun and games, processions and open houses.

In remote villages, guests are expected to taste tuak and eat at each household. Another popular alcoholic beverage being served during Gawai is langkau. Langkau is made from fermented rice wine (tuak) and cooked in a barrel with a little hose hanging off the top of the barrel. The alcoholic levels in langkau is much stronger and is said to be the Sarawakian version of vodka. Music and dancing usually follow suit (which consists of mostly joget or dangdut hits).

In Kuching, for instance, celebrations start a week before with colourful street parades and cultural activities. On the eve of the Gawai, a grand state dinner is usually held with singing, dancing and a beauty pageant, which culminates in the crowning of several Gawai Queens, one each for Iban, Bidayuh and Orang Ulu communities.


Obviously, Gawai Dayak is the best and the most interesting time to visit Sarawak as you can see and sample the lifestyle and its festivities of other various Dayak communities. So if all this interest you, come and check us out at www.SarawakBorneoTour.com and see what we have to offer to bring the experience of the Gawai Celebrations to you. You can e-mail your inquiries to Ask@SarawakBorneoTour.com for more info.

Tags: Tuak | Langkau | Gawai Festival | Sarawak | Borneo | Dayak | Gawai | Iban | Gawai Dayak | Bidayuh | Kuching City | Gawai Dayak | longhouse |

FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 2012

Sarawak Baleh River Raft Safari

The Sarawak Baleh River Raft Safari is an electrifying river safari race that begins with a night-long of merrymaking, showcasing the Iban hospitality before the race is launched the next day. Spectators will witness top rafters from all over pitting their physical and mental skills against the dangerous rapids of a 50 km stretch of the Sarawak Baleh River. The Baleh River Raft Safari is an accomplishment that needs accuracy and is very challenging indeed.
Visitors can witness rafters navigating their man-made natural rafts down rapid streams of Malaysia’s longest river; Rejang river Sarawak, to Sarawak’s last frontier town of Kapit. The time and venue are:

Date: 5 - 8 April 2012
Event: Baleh Kapit Safari 2012
Venue: RH Salang Pulau Sibau Mujong, RH Bangkong Ng Banyau Mujong, Kapit River Front and Kapit Town

The Sarawak Baleh River Raft Safari started in 1996 and normally takes place in the month of April. The sport is very challenging. Participants need to steer their rafts through treacherous rapids.

The best part of the Baleh River Raft Safari is that, participants will get the chance to see various cultural multiplicity and ethnic heritage of the native riverine communities. An overnight stay in a local longhouse provides competitors a once-in-a-lifetime insight into the lifestyle of the tribes that call the wild river their life-source and untamed rainforest their home.

The Sarawak Baleh River Raft Safari is an extremely demanding and exciting two-day rafting race, which sees top rafters pit their physical and mental skills against numerous rapids at the 50 km stretch Baleh River. The rafting for the Men's Bamboo Raft Open Category will start from Rumah Minggat, Sungai Oyan, Mujong and stop for a night at Rumah Naong, Batu Bansu, Baleh on the first day.

The participants will resume their rafting from Rumah Naong, Batu Bansu, Baleh and end at Kapit Wharf, Kapit on the second day. On the same day, all other rafts in the Men's Bamboo Raft Closed, Men's Freestyle Raft, Women and Tourists Categories will begin their journey from Rumah Naong, Batu Bansu, Baleh and end at Kapit Wharf, Kapit.

This event is open to international participants so do not miss this thrilling ride of a lifetime. Check out details of the event at www.SarawakBorneoTour.com or e-mail us at Ask@SarawakBorneoTour.com for information.

 
Tags: Sarawak Baleh River Raft Safari | Baleh | raft | river safari | Sarawak | Rejang | Kapit | Baleh Kapit Safari 2012 | Baleh River | Sarawak water sport | Kuching | Borneo |

Benak Festival famously known as Tidal Bore Carnival in Sarawak


River Surfing Fun yo!


Sri Aman is a market town and port, and the capital of Sri Aman District and Sri Aman Division in Sarawak, East Malaysia. Sri Aman is also called Bandar Sri Aman, and was formerly known as Simanggang and has a population of 26,100. Sri Aman in the Malay language means "town of peace ." Sri Aman is located on the Lupar River, it is 193 kilometers, a three hour drive, from Kuching the capital city of Sarawak. It is a trade center for the timber, oil palm, rubber, and pepper of its mostly agricultural district.

Benak is the native tongue for tidal bore, and Benak happens everyday. During spring tide, tidal bore with a high magnitude, it can be observed clearly from distance. The 'Benak' continues its journey for another 30km inland, ending near the small village of Engkili in the same division.

Bores occur in relatively few locations worldwide, usually in areas with a large tidal range (typically more than 6 metres (20 ft) between high and low water) and where incoming tides are funneled into a shallow, narrowing river or lake via a broad bay.
 
Tidal Bore Surfer in Sarawak
Tidal Bore Surfer in Sarawak

The funnel-like shape not only increases the tidal range, but it can also decrease the duration of the flood tide, down to a point where the flood appears as a sudden increase in the water level. A tidal bore takes place during the flood tide and never during the ebb tide. A tidal bore may take on various forms, ranging from a single breaking wavefront with a roller — somewhat like a hydraulic jump — to "undular bores", comprising a smooth wavefront followed by a train of secondary waves (whelps). Large bores can be particularly unsafe for shipping but also present opportunities for river surfing!

There are only five spots in Asia where this unusual phenomena occurs and Sri Aman is sure to provide the excitement and fun to see for ourselves of one of the best waves in the world.
It has become an annual event and held every year. The festival is set to be one of the most exciting tourism destination.

I recommend to all to come over to Sri Aman to feel and experience Benak Festival that will promise only fun and excitement for you.
 
The red circle marks the location of the event.

Book your tours through www.SarawakBorneoTour.com to come and celebrate Benak Festival wih us or you may e-mail your inquiries to Ask@SarawakBorneoTour.com.

Date: 6 - 8 April 2012
Event: Tidal Bore Carnival (Benak Festival)
Venue: Tebingan Batang Lupar, Sri Aman
Tags: Benak | Benak Festival | Sri Aman | Sarawak | Sarawak Borneo | river surfing | surf | tidal bore | tidal bore carnival | Kuching | Kuching City | Sarawak river sport |

FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2012

Ba'kelalan's Unknown Apple Orchard

 
Ba’kelalan is one of the great enchantments of the Kelabit Highlands and is revered with sub-tropical natural beauty and amazingly fresh weather. Ba’Kelalan is located at the heart of Borneo's notable and oldest tropical rainforest.  

The main village here belongs to the Lun Bawang race, a group of people known for agricultural farming of paddy fields, and especially their mastery in successfully cultivating apples in the highlands. The name Ba’ Kelalan comes from the Kelalan River, while Ba’ refers to wetlands in the Lun Bawang native tongue.

They produce Malaysia’s first apples; sugary and crunchy, absolutely delicious. Other fruits are also grown here, especially mandarin oranges, passion fruit, budding strawberries, vanilla and asparagus.

Take a bite into the crunchy apples will surely erect your taste buds. It is sweet, tasty and amazingly fresh, mostly due to its natural surroundings and almost free of pesticides.

The limited use of pesticides also facilitated in ensuring the apples to thrive in the cool climates of Ba’ Kelalan plus the proper technique of pruning and appropriate use of fertilisers also helped.

There are numerous variations of apples grown here. These are the Ba’ Kelalan (formerly known as Manalagi) apples, Rome Beauty, Tropical Beauty, Lady Williams, Anna apples, Kwanglin and Jonathon.

The farm is now run by former pastor, Tagal Paran, Andrew’s brother. To celebrate the apple harvest, each year an Apple Fiesta is held in Ba’ Kelalan.

Apart from the apple picking, its stunning scenery, the lovely view of the mountains, valleys, rivers, flora and fauna and wildlife are pretty unspoiled and were so for generations. The people inhabiting the area are, likewise, of unique culture and tradition.

Ba’kelalan is a land of the friendly smiles from the young and old. The people will make you feel that you are truly at home and is one of them and, which sets Ba'Kelalan apart from the others.
 


Visitors wishing to experience Malaysia’s delicious apples, picturesque rolling hills and warmth of the Lun Bawang tribe, should visit this unrivalled spot in Malaysia. E-mail us on Ask@SarawakBorneoTour.com for inquiry and we will get back to you soon. You can also check out www.SarawakBorneoTour.com for an overview of Ba’Kelalan packages offered with the best price.
Tags: bakelalan | ba'kelalan | lun bawang | kelabit highlands | apple harvest | sarawak | borneo | orang ulu | ulu tribe sarawak |

Things to Prepare if you are going to Bako National Park for an unforgettable adventure

 

With its rainforest, abundant wildlife, jungle streams, waterfalls, interesting plant life, secluded beaches, panoramic rocky shoreline, bizarre rock formations and extensive network of trekking trails, Bako National Park Sarawak offers visitors an excellent introduction to the rainforest and coastline of Borneo.

Bako may not have an instantly recognisable star attraction, but there can be very few places in the world that pack so much natural beauty into such a limited area, all just 37 km from Kuching. Its accessibility - and its sheer range of attractions and activities - have made Bako National Park Sarawak one of the most popular nature parks in Sarawak.

Bako National Park Sarawak contains an incredible variety of plant species and vegetation types, and this is one of the park’s great attractions it is also probably the best place in Sarawak for wildlife experiences. Visit www.SarawakBorneoTour.com and check out our full-day tour package to Bako National Park Sarawak to experience the nature and see the wildlife of Sarawak's tropical rainforests.
 
 
If you are going for the trip here are a few suggestions on what to pack for the eco-journey. It is recommended that visitors prepare their own checklist for apparel or equipment before embarking on their trek which may be useful or necessary, depending on their plans. In terms of clothing, it is ideal for a visitor to dress in short's and T-shirts when going on trails in the forest, but for extra protection against sunburn on the plateau and against insects in the evening it is highly recommended for visitors to bring along slacks and long-sleeve shirts.

Be prepared for muddy trails in the forest if after rain so it is best for visitors to wear training shoes or comfortable boots with good soles. Take note that it can get very hot on the plateau, so a hat, re-hydration salts and sun lotion may be needed on longer walks.

Water bottles are essential in making the trip, and necessity item on longer walks. To bring enough water for the entire trip may be a challenge for the long trek, therefore it is a good idea to bring water purifying tablets or a water filter since even in the dry season, there are nearly always some flowing freshwater streams encountered along the long trails.
 

A small torch is useful for overnight journeys and rucksack to carry your extra clothes. Bring along a packed lunch and some chocolate, raisins to maintain sugar levels.  Bottled water can be bought at the canteen at the Park Headquarters.

So be sure that you prepare your list of things to bring for the trip, so your Borneo eco-journey would be an enjoyable and hassle-free nature-loving excursion.
So come check out www.SarawakBorneoTour.com for more details for the trip. Email us at Ask@SarawakBorneoTour.com for inquiry and we will get back to you soon.
Tags: bako national park | sarawak | rainforest | kuching | proboscis monkey | mangrove | borneo | sarawak river cruise | bako | sea stack | kampong bako | gunung santubong |

THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012

Bako National Park, the smallest national park in whole Sarawak

 

Bako National Park

 

Dry season is the best time to plan your trip to Bako National Park Sarawak, which is from the month of April to October. Boat journey to Bako National Park Sarawak between the month of November to March may be too rough during the monsoon season.

A day trip to Bako National Park Sarawak can be very rewarding, and it is recommended that the journey to Bako National Park Sarawak should begin early in the morning. To fully enjoy the breathtaking experiences that Bako National Park Sarawak offers, an overnight stay or longer should be considered before making the trip.

SarawakBorneoTour.com offers trip to Bako National Park Sarawak, where we can guide you on a day trip, and arrange transport and permit. From Kuching, Bako National Park Sarawak can be reached in two stages-about 45 minutes’ drive on a new sealed road to the park terminal at Kampung Bako, followed by a 30-minute boat ride to the Bako National Park Sarawak Headquarters at Teluk Asam. Taxi fares from Kuching are reasonable and an inexpensive bus service is also available.
 
 
A permit for entering Bako National Park Sarawak and accommodation bookings can be obtained at www.SarawakBorneoTour.com.

The water at the Bako Park National Sarawak Headquarter is too shallow for boats to reach the jetty at low tide. To avoid waiting at Kampung Bako boat terminal, it is advisable to time your arrival during high tide. From the jetty, boats are operated by the villagers at reasonable fares. The boat ride to  Bako National Park Headquarters provide a good view of the mangrove forest that lines the river mouth and bay.

When heading out, the visitor has a splendid view of Gunung Santubong, the mountain on the west side of the bay. The cliffs and bay of Bako Peninsula are on the right. A spectacular sea stack can be seen along the coastal cliffs beyond Park Headquarters. The sandstone forming the stack was modeled by the incessant beating of the waves as well as the chemical weathering in the hot and wet tropical climate.

So click on to www.SarawakBorneoTour.com for more details. Look for Bako National Park Sarawak trip package for the best deals in town.
Tags: Bako | Bako National Park | World Heritage | Sarawak Borneo | Sarawak | Kuching City | Kuching | nature | Proboscis Monkey |

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY19, 2012

Shake Your Booty at the Rainforest World Music Festival 2011

 

Shake it to the right, shake it to the left, shake it all around… shake them booties to the pulsating beats of the Rainforest World Music Festival in Kuching city of Sarawak! The madness was here again with an adrenalin rush that would grip you and leave you spent, yet wanting more. I am talking about the contagious fever of the Rainforest World Music Festival, a well-known and much anticipated 3-day international musical extravaganza organized by Sarawak Tourism Board annually in the month of July.

Held in the heartland of Borneo, specifically at the Sarawak Cultural Village in Santubong area, 35 kilometres from Kuching, Sarawak, the Rainforest World Music Festival is renowned for its diverse representation of world music. Tickets to the Rainforest World Music Festival were grabbed up so fast it would make anyone’s head spin. I was lucky to be allocated two tickets, valued at RM110 per ticket, sponsored by my company, and before you could say “Wonderful”, I had invited my best buddy to go with me. We did not attend the music workshops during the day due to work commitments, but we definitely went to the music performances that evening, a night you would not want to miss.

Driving from Kuching City to the Rainforest World Music Festival pick-up point in Santubong took about 40 minutes, a bit longer as there was more traffic on the road. No private vehicles were allowed to drive directly to Sarawak Cultural Village; the main venue of the Rainforest World Music Festival located another 10-15 minutes drive away. From the pick-up point, we took the transfer coach, costing RM5 per person one way to the Rainforest World Music Festival.

What a sight to behold… there were hundreds and thousands of people, milling and gathering around the entrances, surrounding compounds and stage areas of the Rainforest World Music Festival; and at a glance, more than half of the people there were overseas visitors. That was how popular and famous the Rainforest World Music Festival had become after its first inception in 1998, making this year 2011, its 14th year as the largest and most successful music festival event showcasing traditional, fusion and contemporary music from around the world.

I briefly browsed the local handicrafts on sale at the Rainforest World Craft Bazaar held in conjunction with the music festival, but was not interested enough to buy any. On the other hand, the colourful range of ceramic pottery and ethnic-designed costume jewellery appeared to be hot items, especially with foreign visitors who presumably bought them as souvenirs.

The Rainforest World Music Festival had evolved over the years to become a major social event, and that was part of its worldwide or international appeal, because where there were people of varied backgrounds, young and old, music, food and drinks, including beers and wine, all gathered in one place, there were bound to be plenty of merrymaking!

This year, the countries where the music bands participating in the Rainforest World Music Festival, came from Australia, Canada, Dominican Republic, Eastern Europe, Finland, France, Iran, Italy, Kenya, Latvia, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Poland, Senegal, USA and Vanuatu. Of the 21 bands represented, the favourites were Frigg from Finland, Joaquin Diaz Band from Dominican Republic, and Lisa Haley and the Zydecats from USA. Malaysia’s representatives included Agungbeat from Sabah and Masters of Sape from Sarawak.

All the bands were good but the fast exciting Afro-Caribbean merengue music by Joaquin Diaz of the Dominican Republic ruled the evening, as did the lively and energetic Louisana music by Lisa Haley and the Zydecats of USA. Lisa Haley is a grammy nominee who played progressive Louisana music in her own neo-traditional zydeco/Cajun style. The rhythmic beats combined with the intense atmosphere filled with diverse musical repertoire at the Rainforest World Music Festival were electrifying.

Surprisingly, in the midst of the huge boisterous crowds, standing room only, we met a couple of friends, ready to party long into the night and have a funky great time at the Rainforest World Music Festival. First came the beers and after five rounds of “one-go”, my buddy was dizzy and feeling the effects of the alcohol. Fortunately I was the designated driver and only had two beers, sipped slowly. Next on the list were red wines and by this point, we decided it was time to leave and head homeward.

We took the transfer coach back to the pick-up point and carefully drove back to Kuching. The ride back turned out to be longer than usual, as it was interspersed with abrupt stops for throw-up sessions by my buddy, about 4-5 times, I believe. I was considerably sober and looking forward to next year’s Rainforest World Music Festival and another unforgettable musical experience.

Tags: music festival events | music of the rainforest | rainforest music festival | Sarawak Borneo music | music Sarawak |